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1) Make sure you meet the PhD requirements for your institution “PhD students and their supervisors often presume things without checking.One supervisor told his student that a PhD was about 300 pages long so he wrote 300 pages.

Unfortunately the supervisor had meant double-spaced, and the student had written single-spaced The disposable academic The Economist.Unfortunately the supervisor had meant double-spaced, and the student had written single-spaced.

Getting rid of 40,000 extra words with two weeks to go is not recommended.” ( Hannah Farrimond, lecturer in medical sociology, Exeter University) 2) Keep perspective “Everyone wants their thesis to be amazing, their magnum opus 3 Dec 2014 - Professor Rodney E. Rohde is Director of the Clinical Laboratory Science Program in the College of Health Professions at Texas State University. I've taught hundreds of   hours were my best friend. This was an opportunity for me to get to know professors and get one-on-one attention when I needed it..” ( Hannah Farrimond, lecturer in medical sociology, Exeter University) 2) Keep perspective “Everyone wants their thesis to be amazing, their magnum opus.But your most important work will come later 3 Dec 2014 - Professor Rodney E. Rohde is Director of the Clinical Laboratory Science Program in the College of Health Professions at Texas State University. I've taught hundreds of   hours were my best friend. This was an opportunity for me to get to know professors and get one-on-one attention when I needed it..But your most important work will come later.Your peers are unlikely to read your thesis and judge you on it best website to buy a taxation law coursework one hour A4 (British/European) AMA.Your peers are unlikely to read your thesis and judge you on it.They are more likely to read any papers (articles, chapters, books) that result from it best website to buy a taxation law coursework one hour A4 (British/European) AMA.They are more likely to read any papers (articles, chapters, books) that result from it.” ( Dean D’Souza, PhD in cognitive neuroscience, Birkbeck, University of London) 3) Write the introduction last “Writing the introduction and conclusion together will help to tie up the thesis together, so save it for the end.” ( Ashish Jaiswal, PhD in business education, University of Oxford) 4) Use apps “Trello is a project management tool (available as a smartphone app) which allows you to create ‘boards’ on which to pin all of your outstanding tasks, deadlines, and ideas.

It allows you to make checklists too so you know that all of your important stuff is listed and to-hand, meaning you can focus on one thing at a time.

It’s satisfying to move notes into the ‘done’ column too.” ( Lucy Irving, PhD in psychology, Middlesex University) 5) Address the unanswered questions “There will always be unanswered questions – don’t try to ignore or, even worse, obfuscate them.On the contrary, actively draw attention to them; identify them in your conclusion as areas for further investigation.Your PhD viva will go badly if you’ve attempted to disregard or evade the unresolved issues that your thesis has inevitably opened up.” ( Michael Perfect, PhD in English literature, University of Cambridge) 6) Buy your own laser printer “A basic monochrome laser printer that can print duplex (two-sided) can be bought online for less than £100, with off-brand replacement toners available for about £30 a pop.

Repeatedly reprinting and editing draft thesis chapters has two very helpful functions.Firstly, it takes your work off the screen and onto paper, which is usually easier to proof.Secondly, it gives you a legitimate excuse to get away from your desk.” ( James Brown, PhD in architectural education, Queen’s University Belfast) 7) Checking is important “On days when your brain is too tired to write, check quotations, bibliography etc so you’re still making progress.” ( Julia Wright, professor of English at Dalhousie University, Canada) 8) Get feedback on the whole thesis “We often get feedback on individual chapters but plan to get feedback from your supervisor on the PhD as a whole to make sure it all hangs together nicely.

” ( Mel Rohse, PhD in peace studies, University of Bradford) 9) Make sure you know when it will end “Sometimes supervisors use optimistic words such as ‘You are nearly there!’ Ask them to be specific.Are you three months away, or do you have six months’ worth of work? Or is it just a month’s load?” ( Rifat Mahbub, PhD in women’s studies, University of York) 10) Prepare for the viva “Don’t just focus on the thesis – the viva is very important too and examiners’ opinions can change following a successful viva.Remember that you are the expert in your specific field, not the examiners, and ask your supervisor to arrange a mock viva if practically possible.” ( Christine Jones, 11) Develop your own style “Take into account everything your supervisor has said, attend to their suggestions about revisions to your work but also be true to your own style of writing.What I found constructive was paying attention to the work of novelists I enjoy reading.

It may seem that their style has nothing to do with your own field of research, but this does not matter.You can still absorb something of how they write and what makes it effective, compelling and believable.” ( Sarah Skyrme, PhD in sociology, Newcastle University) 12) Remember that more is not always better “A PhD thesis is not a race to the highest page count; don’t waste time padding.” ( Francis Woodhouse, PhD in mathematical biology, University of Cambridge) 13) Get a buddy “Find a colleague, your partner, a friend who is willing to support you.Share with them your milestones and goals, and agree to be accountable to them.

This doesn’t mean they get to hassle or nag you, it just means someone else knows what you’re up to, and can help to check if your planning is realistic and achievable.” ( Cassandra Steer, PhD in criminology, University of Amsterdam) 14) Don’t pursue perfectionism “Remember that a PhD doesn’t have to be a masterpiece.Nothing more self-crippling than perfectionism.” ( Nathan Waddell, lecturer in modernist literature, Nottingham University) 15) Look after yourself “Go outside.Fresh air, trees and sunshine do wonders for what’s left of your sanity.” ( Helen Coverdale, PhD in law, LSE) • Do you have any tips to add? Share your advice in the comments below.An Oxford University student killed himself just hours after being told his PhD thesis needed to be improved, an inquest has heard.A coroner was told how former Buddhist monk Juncnok Park hanged himself after what he saw was a colossal disappointment and an embarrassment.The criticism was probably the first time the South Korean mature student had ever failed at anything in his life.

Oxford University student Juncnok Park, who attended Wolfson College, killed himself after being told his PhD thesis needed to be improved The inquest heard how Mr Park, who had served ten years under holy orders in his native country, shunned television and other pastimes to devote himself to gaining a doctorate in Buddhism.It was hours after his academic supervisor confirmed his fears - that examiners believed he was not yet ready to be awarded a doctorate from the university - that the 37-year-old student took his life.Police were called to Wolfson College, Oxford, on Friday, July 18 last year after a cleaner found Mr Park's bedroom door blocked and noticed blood on the floor.Police constable Henry Gillingham, of Thames Valley Police, who was joined by a paramedic, said: 'I immediately attempted to open it.I barged the door and a male's body fell on to a table pushed up against the door.

' PC Gillingham shouldered the door open, causing Mr Park's body to tumble on to his bed and then to the floor.The paramedic confirmed that the scholar was dead.Consultant pathologist Dr Nicholas Hunt gave the cause of death as hanging, despite wounds inflicted on his wrists.

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Mr Park, from Incheon, near Seoul, arrived at Oxford University in 2003 on a scholarship to read Oriental Studies, with a doctorate in Buddhism.Lance Cousins, a fellow of Wolfson College and one of Mr Park's two supervisors, said the student had already completed his thesis and returned to Oxford from South Korea for an interview on it with two examiners.

He had been due to return to Korea the day after he died .He had been due to return to Korea the day after he died.

But Mr Park began to worry after receiving no feedback, and at lunch with Mr Cousins on July 17 - the day before his body was found - he asked what the outcome was.'He was extremely well thought of,' said Mr Cousins, of Mr Park's academic standing Some UoL research degree theses submitted by UCL students in the areas of classical, Germanic, Latin American studies; history and law are not held: check the catalogue of the UoL School of Advanced Study for availability. Note that no research theses are now held by the University of London Library..'He was extremely well thought of,' said Mr Cousins, of Mr Park's academic standing.'He was very committed to what he believed in.'He added that he had not expected the student to be found wanting by the examiners.Describing the scholar's attitude to the news, he told the inquest in Oxford: 'He was clearly not very happy and worried about it, but it was difficult for me without the final report.'I was urging him to wait and see what he actually got.' When asked by the coroner if he was concerned for his student, Mr Cousins said: 'No.

I was a little worried about the longer term but it simply didn't occur to me that there might be a more immediate problem.

'He added that Mr Park would have considered the news an embarrassment and something which could badly affect his prospects back home.Sowon Park, a friend of the undergraduate and the last person to see him alive, described him as 'an exceptional student.' She said: 'He had been a Buddhist priest for about ten years and had a very calm, detached manner about him.'When I saw him he told me it (the interview) hadn't gone well and he told me he didn't know if he would get his degree or not.'This must have been a real shock to him as he had never failed anything in his life.

' Oxfordshire Coroner Nicholas Gardiner said: 'It is very clear that Mr Park took the bad news, or what he perceived to be bad news, not very well.'It would have been an embarrassment to him.' Mine's brilliant in all ways, so I am lucky! #2 Submitted by Don on July 11, 2013 - 7:19pm These "truths" are very helpful - thank you Dr.Brabazon! Have only just begun a professional doctorate but am planning and thinking ahead regarding my dissertation.

#3 Submitted by touet on July 11, 2013 - 10:03pm A bit of a counsel of perfection but useful insights.I don't think 'complete commitment' to a PhD student is feasible or even desirable.Most supervisors have other things to do, teaching, admin., their own research and that makes them a better supervisor #4 Submitted by surajitdb on July 12, 2013 - 12:40am Great insight #5 Submitted by funnythat on July 12, 2013 - 10:24am Truth number 1 would suggest that you should never be the first PhD student of a researcher.This would mean that no-one can ever start supervising PhDs.

Truth 2 only applies if the studentship is not a project for which the supervisor has generated the funds (this is only true on the minority of cases).Truth 3 and 4 are almost mutually exclusive.Administrative decisions are taken by multiple layers in the University.If you want to be protected against administrative delays, you need a supervisor with enough "muscle" in the University.These will be the stars, which are mostly absent.

What you need is a star supervisor, who has a good and permanent lab head who has all the technical knowledge and is usually present in the lab.Truth 5 suggests that all PhD students can write up their own work for publication and get it published in a good journal without the supervisor's input.Some exceptional PhD students may be able to do that, but they are few and far between.So I would suggest to take these "truths" with a pinch of salt.#6 Submitted by Je-267249 on May 31, 2016 - 10:47pm I agree! #7 Submitted by Ben Saunders on July 12, 2013 - 11:31am Many of these strike me as either banal or incorrect, at least in my field/experience.

"Ensure that the department and university you are considering assign supervisors on the basis of intellectual ability rather than available workload.Supervising students to completion is incredibly difficult.The final few months require complete commitment from both supervisor and postgraduate.) So you shouldn't accept a supervisor determined on basis of workload, because supervision is so demanding.

How is an overworked supervisor going to be able to dedicate so much time to helping you then? #8 Submitted by cgk on July 14, 2013 - 4:27pm "But it is teaching that will get them their first post (and probably their second and third)." This is a half-truth at best from my experience of University recruitment (from both sides of the table - management sciences) - teaching is a hygiene factor, once you have some it becomes irrelevant.So yes pick up some but you that generally only puts you on par with candidates, income generation/paper outputs will put you over the top - so if it is a choice between a little more teaching and turning out a paper, turn out the paper.#9 Submitted by zytec on July 14, 2013 - 5:04pm Ah the market pressure of shopping for a Ph D and all because the lady wants to be an educated wage slave.#10 Submitted by csadangi on July 14, 2013 - 9:47pm Thanks a lot for the valuable suggestions.

I started my PhD about one month ago but i have decided to change groups now.I know 1 month is too early to decide if i want to stay with this group but seeing the circumstances i decided to change.I had arguments over non-sense things with the PI and then he threatened me to destroy my career (by saying he won't write a good recommendation at the end) and he said leave if you want to leave.Then i said to him last week i am stressed out due to family problems and need 2 days off and he answered me keep stress at home, you just come here to work so work.

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And there were many more issues which led to the decision of quiting and moving over to some other place.

#11 Submitted by harrowagenda21 on July 17, 2013 - 4:15am It is particularly helpful if supervisors maintain information about present students and past ones.They way you can see if they publish and get jobs 27 Aug 2014 - 1) Make sure you meet the PhD requirements for your institution “PhD students   (Ashish Jaiswal, PhD in business education, University of Oxford)   “We often get feedback on individual chapters but plan to get feedback from your supervisor on the PhD as a whole to make sure it all hangs together nicely..They way you can see if they publish and get jobs.

Also, the sheer numbers that a supervisor has are important.In our university 7 is the max allowed and I am always at that, because at a top Australian university and in an area that is in demand Handbook for students in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities at King's College London, University of London.   Undergraduate and MSci Physics & Philosophy. The following   All students taking the module will be required to attend a weekly dissertation seminar in Semester 2 and make one presentation of their work..In our university 7 is the max allowed and I am always at that, because at a top Australian university and in an area that is in demand.More than that number and I could not do the job effectively Handbook for students in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities at King's College London, University of London.   Undergraduate and MSci Physics & Philosophy. The following   All students taking the module will be required to attend a weekly dissertation seminar in Semester 2 and make one presentation of their work..

More than that number and I could not do the job effectively.

Students are not often aware that we do other things with our time, too.Weekly supervisor meetings may be a good idea if you have 1-2-3 students fsfeliciarental.com/coursework/should-i-buy-a-college-mass-communication-coursework-a4-british-european-american-4-pages-1100-words-confidentiality.Weekly supervisor meetings may be a good idea if you have 1-2-3 students.Otherwise I am afraid they have to be less frequent.Co-supervisors are absolutely mandatory in many Australian universities.

Generally I have found them helpful, and have been one.

They temper the ego or the cussedness of some main supervisors.What is annoying is Advisory Panels, which are on top of the 1-2 supervisors and who turn out for key moments like confirmation of candidature.They are too big and can produce conflicting advice when you have 4 -5 people in the room.#12 Submitted by MichaelWhitworth on July 18, 2013 - 4:50pm While there's some good advice here there are also contradictions, as noted by Funny That.The presentation from the point of view of the prospective PhD student shopping around fails to acknowledge institutional constraints (most obviously, there being a limit to the number of individuals one person can supervise).

Moreover, much of this advice feels like it's specific to certain kinds of institution and/or certain subjects.#13 Submitted by alvin on July 20, 2013 - 5:30am There are also few scientific search engines which they use for their PhD research work and they dont even tell.essay writing services #14 Submitted by micronaut on July 26, 2013 - 10:39am I finished a PhD at a large UK institution about a year ago.It was a shocking experience that has left me with nothing but poor health and a worthless qualification.I was part of a well funded post graduate studentship program in an emergent field, with all the potential of being a "next big thing".

I took on a project in a lab where I knew the supervisor was not an easy person to work with, but the lab was well funded and equipped.I thought that as long as I had the raw materials I could just live with whatever the personality was like.My supervisor enforced the project be completed to his design, but provided no support or training towards achieving this.There was no publication strategy or, from what I know now, any pre-reading of any kind before I started.

None of the projects submitted to the program where ever assessed by anybody on the program, who it turned out had disengaged from any commitments once the funding was approved.The project was a vehicle for the supervisor to tap into the research fund that came with the program and get a free student for their lab.My colleagues began to experience the same situation and we were cash cows ripe for plundering, working on pointless projects.There was on update to the funding bodies, no reports, and no accountability for anybody involved.Over 3 years I was psychologically and emotionally abused.

Experimental problems resulted in demoralizing meetings with blame attributed to technical incompetence, threats of failure, and bullying to just work more hours until it worked.Progress meetings with internal examiners were used to belittle and berate me.I raised issues with student services and was told that there was little they could do within the framework of academia.Other supervisors would also not intervene as it is bad form to advise on another supervisor's student.An inappropriate working environment resulted in my rupturing two inter-vertebral discs.

I was offered no support and told that time off showed a lack of commitment to my work, and any lost hours would result in failure.Subsequently I worked for 6 months relying on Tramadol to function.In the final year my supervisor left the lab for a promotion in another university.I was told to move or leave and the program would not intervene with any alternative project or facilities to continue the project.I was forced to stop work and pack up the lab, organizing the logistics of the move as well as the construction of the new lab which was not fit for purpose upon arrival.

I was intimidated into working on this under the false promise of an extension, spending 6 months working on equipment purchasing, installation, lab infrastructure designs, and cleaning.The extension was denied and my appeals to the university resulted in clandestine phone calls and back room chats where I was told to simply shut up and get on with it or my PhD would be burned.The extension application would invoke an enquiry by the funding body, exposing the problems with the program and it would be easier to blame it on a bad student.My supervisor abandoned me in the final year and told me to expect to fail.I worked the remainder of my time living in the lab, without sleep during the week, eating pro-plus and whatever was in the vending machines, away from home with no financial, pastoral, or technical support.

I became depressed and exhausted, but I managed to cobble together a thesis and submitted on time.I organized my own examiners and the viva was the most constructive and supportive experience of my PhD, resulting in a pass with minor corrections.Some of this I attribute to my work, the rest to back room dealings to ensure no further problems.

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Due to the nature of the experience I gained no publications from my work.I am now left in a position where my chances at a career of any kind in science were over before the training ended.

Many of my friends from the program are in a similar position, but are scared to come forward and raise a complaint for fear of retribution should they ever be able to interview for a post doctoral research position Where to order thesis physics 100% original double spaced 68 pages / 18700 words A4 (British/European) Master's.Many of my friends from the program are in a similar position, but are scared to come forward and raise a complaint for fear of retribution should they ever be able to interview for a post doctoral research position.

Some of the students had good supervisors and have done well from the program, however these were a minority, and for those that had a bad experience, it was very bad indeed.While I must simply pick up the pieces and move on, I am saddened that the awareness of the culture of PhD training is largely unknown outside of academia 11 Jul 2013 - There are some important dos and don'ts to bear in mind when choosing someone to oversee your doctoral thesis, advises Tara Brabazon.   One of my proudest moments emerged in a tutors' meeting for my large first-year course at Murdoch University: creative industries. I apologised to my tutors for the  .While I must simply pick up the pieces and move on, I am saddened that the awareness of the culture of PhD training is largely unknown outside of academia.It is an antiquated medieval system that is too insular and protects those in positions of responsibility 11 Jul 2013 - There are some important dos and don'ts to bear in mind when choosing someone to oversee your doctoral thesis, advises Tara Brabazon.   One of my proudest moments emerged in a tutors' meeting for my large first-year course at Murdoch University: creative industries. I apologised to my tutors for the  .It is an antiquated medieval system that is too insular and protects those in positions of responsibility.Provided that supervisors are bringing regular funding into their institution they are often able to behave however they like, with total impunity.

Employment laws and even human rights can be violated and the university with seldom intervene if they can avoid it .Employment laws and even human rights can be violated and the university with seldom intervene if they can avoid it.These programs are also enjoying large sums of tax payer funding which in my case was entirely wasted.Provided with the most minimal of organization and management these projects could have been very successful and impacting, however they didn't have to be because payment was up-front, and consequently they were not.I hope that in future this "industry" can be cleaned up through proper regulation by the funding bodies.

But until then I fear the medieval guild system will persist, and students will suffer in silence.

#15 Submitted by ket DCN-Corp-UK on July 27, 2013 - 6:07pm Interesting commentary.However, from those in the know, is it not believed that the "10 truths" describe what has been known for years / decades? In fact my former Ph.D supervisor has taken to highlight the article in his Twitter feed.I found such a highlight extremely ironic, because I felt it described him to a 'tune'.Unfortunately, neither the article nor the comments subsequently - explain what happens to non-registered Ph.

D students upon discovery of commercially insightful data / information.D (along with some highly derogatory comments) - a few years down the line I am still being heavily harassed, threatened, etc.by my so called 'friends' at an UK university.Frankly it is damn right disgusting, that personnel whom describe themselves as 'looking-out' for the wider public via tax payers monies - are involving themselves in such activities.

Finally, as stated by the last comment - until Ph.D program's, studentships, supervisors, etc.are heavily regulated (as similar to the financial services sector), then such unfortunate practices will continue on.#16 Submitted by tollyho on July 29, 2013 - 3:25am Here's another truth: The 3-year PhD is based on an outdated model, from times when there was no lightning fast access to research or information.

One could spend 8 hours in a day looking for one or two articles, but not have energy after that to read them.It takes 30 seconds to find most relevant articles, leaving many 8-hour workdays unencumbered by wild goose chases.There's really no excuse for a PhD to take so long.Unless a person works in a field requiring experimentation and lab work, the PhD project should take no longer than 6-10 months, start to finish -- that's if a candidate comes in with a solid background knowledge (preferably a taught MA -- yes, a TAUGHT MA, since a BA doesn't really even scratch the surface of any subject).

I know people will hate me for saying this, or find me stupid, but I've yet to meet a successful doctoral candidate who took longer than 6-10 months of full-time work to do a PhD, whether they did it in one fell swoop or broke those hours up over the course of a 3- or 4-year candidacy.We could drastically shorten the length of candidacies if we would only recognize new realities of access to information and research.#17 Submitted by ahash8 on September 3, 2016 - 9:57pm I'm sorry but it's simply impossible to do a single PhD project in any area of Science in under a year (2 years if you need to collect data and analyze it, 1 year if it's mostly analysis and modelling and you really kill yourself).I mean, you could do it but it would be worthless.And for a PhD thesis in North America you're expected to have 2-3.

So if you really work hard full-time (and if you're very lucky) it ought to take you at least 4-5 years.In North America where students are involved in projects from conception to analysis (and often experimentation) PhDs often take 6-7 YEARS, not months (this is in my field, with Master's level knowledge).I think it could be shorter if the supervisors put more work into coming up with well-formulated ideas, but it takes at least 1 year of research to design a semi-decent project.You're better off not wasting your time.

I'd even have strong reservations about hiring a postdoc that only has 3 years of experience, to me that's barely scratching the surface.Maybe in the humanities but definitely not in any hard science field.#18 Submitted by Buttey on August 1, 2013 - 11:35pm This article just emphasises to me the divergence between Arts and Humanities PhDs an those in STEM subjects.Some elements of the criticism of co-supervisors are valid, but really, if you plan to do original research in science it will often be across subject areas.You will need expert input from supervisors in different areas to make your project even feasible, let alone succesful.

I'm involved on projects that involve physics, molecular biology and geochemistry .None of us could supervise the whole shooting match individually.Science students beware of paying too much attention to articles like this one which has a very limited viewpoint.I welcome the idea that weekly meetings are the ideal, and in my ln own institution I don't know any colleagues who don't maintain this method.As for the idea of 6 month PhDs as proposed by another responder .

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A failure to understand the depth of thought, investigation and scholarly activity involved in a real phd project.It certainly ignores any idea of practical development of skills during a phd .#19 Submitted by TheProf on August 14, 2013 - 5:24am As with all "10 things", these ones are at best half truths and tend to draw on hyperbole and anecdote to attract interest (eg her assertion in several secrets that it is an “us and them game” between students and supervisors/institutions Where to buy a physics thesis 132 pages / 36300 words High School Formatting double spaced.#19 Submitted by TheProf on August 14, 2013 - 5:24am As with all "10 things", these ones are at best half truths and tend to draw on hyperbole and anecdote to attract interest (eg her assertion in several secrets that it is an “us and them game” between students and supervisors/institutions.

And the use of “I once” did this or “I know of a disturbing case” etc).

But what the good Professor doesn’t tell you is that a PhD requires four years of hard work.Perhaps this is something potential PhD students would rather not hear 10 truths a PhD supervisor will never tell you Times Higher Education nbsp.Perhaps this is something potential PhD students would rather not hear.#20 Submitted by Paul Gill on August 15, 2013 - 2:20pm Micronaut, your experience sounds like an unacceptable nightmare.were there no opportunities for you to complain formally? for example, postgrad tutor, head of research etc? in terms of publications, can you not start to publish now? Most of my publications came post PhD, not during it (I simply didnt have the time) fsfeliciarental.com/laboratory-report/need-to-purchase-a-mathematics-laboratory-report-72-pages-19800-words-british-premium.

were there no opportunities for you to complain formally? for example, postgrad tutor, head of research etc? in terms of publications, can you not start to publish now? Most of my publications came post PhD, not during it (I simply didnt have the time).

Most students put up with bad supervision because they think complaining will amount to career suicide.

However, such students often drop out, fail or end up traumatised by the whole experience, which IMO is far worse.as for the comment about completing a PhD in 6-10 months - get real.A PhD in one of the health disciplines that involves recruiting NHS patients usually takes at least 6 months just to navigate NHS ethic and R&D approval.finding evidence is also only part of the PhD.I could probably count on one hand the number of FT PhD completions I've seen in 3 years.

I'd imagine Marty McFly would struggle to complete in 6 months.#21 Submitted by askhan111 on August 18, 2013 - 5:08pm I think these truths are more suitable for guidance of supervisors.As far as the phd students are concerned they have to compromise on many issues, specially for choosing the supervisor mainly due to competition and very limited opportunities of phd funding.#22 Submitted by capepoint on August 20, 2013 - 2:59am Thanks for the advice on the authorship.Any suggestions on the source code? If the supervisor is a co-author, should a PhD student hands over all the codes he or she coded alone? #23 Submitted by Gary on August 27, 2013 - 10:22am Some of these need to be taken with a pinch of salt, particularly the idea that only having one supervisor is some kind of ideal but the general themes are pretty true.

I would really enforce the idea that your supervisor needs to be a decent human being.Whilst an expert in your field is great a PhD student should be capable of doing a lot of work by themselves, after all you should be aiming to know a lot more than your supervisor by the end of your work.What you will need is mentoring and administrative help, where is this? What form do I fill in? Who do I need to speak to about XYZ? A supervisor who is on top of these little issues is invaluable in the long run.I know students with supervisors who are actually mean, rude and even spiteful.I have no idea how they cope, I would gladly have a supervisor from an entirely different subject field who was supportive than one who was very knowledgeable but hostile.

#24 Submitted by KMThorpe on September 13, 2013 - 10:03am Just as some institutions now have teaching fellows who teach but do not research, there may be a role for supervisory fellows to be a title.These people will naturally research because without that contact many of the gains noted here will be lost, but it would distinguish them from the star researchers who are very poor at supervising.I have seen some institutions quietly discourage an academic from taking on any more PhD students because it is known that they lack the skills to really help the student.As not everyone can teach successfully, not every academic can supervise well.We need to recognise this and have some good researching academics who are not permitted to supervise, rather than allowing all of them to do it.

I have seen a number of training courses which help PhD students get 'the most' out of their supervisors and I certainly encourage students to expect and demand good quality supervision and to complain if it is not forthcoming.I have known at least two cases of people changing supervisor and it was the best outcome for them; the original supervisors got over it without a problem, but it could have meant failure for the student.I had a wonderful single supervisor, but the age of the apprenticeship model is over.It is better for there to be a supervisory team, not simply to cover absences of the prime supervisor.Taking a PhD these days is about so much more than just research skills and the subject matter.

The second and in some cases the third supervisor, can be invaluable focusing on the other skills such as writing articles, getting to conferences, getting the skills for a job; indeed as another article in THE this week shows, also thinking about options outside academia.You need to have everyone in the supervisory team working for you in a range of ways.If they cannot do that, then they should be off the list of supervisors.#25 Submitted by Gsinc on October 3, 2013 - 7:25pm I find these views rather pompous, and I feel that many of them are open to question.I also feel it is quite inappropriate to use language such as 'They are selfish, career-obsessed bastards'.

I am very glad that my supervisor did not use language like this - it is not clever.#26 Submitted by vedvyasdwivedi on October 7, 2013 - 10:34am supervisors must have super-vision not narrow or flying vision!!!! #27 Submitted by Dawnbazely on October 12, 2013 - 3:44pm Thank you, Tara: I will share this with my current doctoral student.You make many excellent points that every student needs to think about them seriously, regardless of whether they are in STEM or social sciences, liberal arts and humanities.In the last 7 years, as director of a pan-university, inter-disciplinary research inst.

I have had the chance to interact with grad students from diverse disciplines (every now and then, retreating to my lab, to breathe), and at the end of the day, it's all about 2 individuals interacting, and each supervision experience is unique.#28 Submitted by Joankethly on November 19, 2013 - 9:41am Indeed, a great act of informing common issues among supervisors.This would surely attract the attention of our next generation and present employees.Thumbs up :) url= /buy-instagram-photo-likes/ where to buy followers on instagram /url #29 Submitted by yunvag on November 19, 2013 - 11:01am Hi, Prof.I must say I experienced almost everything you did, with my PhD.

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I had to suffer through supervisors in different camps, a topic change, 2 supervisor changes, the dormant and last minute waiting supervisors, failing to read and the works including the failed attempt to ruin me.Finally, with the decency of the last principal, I managedto complete.It was not just a journey, it was a battle Oxford student killed himself hours after being told PhD thesis wasn t nbsp.

It was not just a journey, it was a battle.

Maybe, at the end supervisors should also be given a progress mark with some impact on their careers when it is negative.#30 Submitted by StevenG on December 23, 2013 - 11:40am Hello! I'm still thinking about my career, but for now have this question.I have just began PhD studies and I don’t want to spend the rest of my life writing the thesis.Can you recommend a book that says how to write a PhD effectively? I mean, in a productive way that would not decrease the quality.

Thanks a lot! Stev #31 Submitted by er2 on January 20, 2014 - 8:26am Personal experience rather than evidence-based research - and from an experienced supervisor? How can these be 'truths'? While some points are useful (but not new), I question the wisdom of other 'advice' best websites to write a custom repair technologies homework Proofreading Standard 47 pages / 12925 words.

Thanks a lot! Stev #31 Submitted by er2 on January 20, 2014 - 8:26am Personal experience rather than evidence-based research - and from an experienced supervisor? How can these be 'truths'? While some points are useful (but not new), I question the wisdom of other 'advice'.

#32 Submitted by JonHead on November 5, 2014 - 1:48pm I very strongly disagree with number 9, 'Weekly supervisory meetings are the best pattern".This will certainly not be the case for many people, and it certainly wouldn't be for me.I do not lack time-management skills, and neither would I rather be partying (seriously, who on earth does a PhD if they would rather be partying or on facebook to the extent that they constantly need their supervisor checking up on them?!).Given all this, I have settled on meeting once a month with my supervisor for the last two years, and we have found that is what suits us.Desperately trying to write something every week just for the sake of it sounds exhausting (after all, some weeks are needed to perhaps work on other things, or just catch up on the literature), and could certainly be detrimental to some people.

#33 Submitted by Apis on November 25, 2014 - 3:03pm I think these 10 ideas are worthy of debate.They would make an excellent discussion point for current supervisors.Personally, I think they range from the sensible to the banal, and even irritating.I am sorry that the writer has had such bad experiences.Of course, teaching on a 'professional doctorate' as I do I find we couldn't manage without co-supervisors - and many's the time that the complementary skills of two supervisors have helped a student out of trouble in my experience.

The suggestion of a weekly supervision session might work for full-time doctoral students but I suspect that full-time doctoral students are in the minority.#34 Submitted by LisaB15 on August 25, 2015 - 5:09am The dependency of PhD students on their supervisors is like apprenticeship in the middle ages - being subject to the arbitrary whims of a certain individual.This video is a humorous take on it.#35 Submitted by LisaB15 on August 25, 2015 - 5:12am This is the correct link: /view/ #02 (see previous comment) #36 Submitted by vainaelisabeth 240631 on October 25, 2015 - 7:11pm I would like to embark on a Ph.

in the Uk, where I am moving in a few weeks.I have been working on a proposal for a month now, but I have read so many emails from Ph.students being ignored by prospective supervisors, that I feel stifled and frustrated.

I have already sent one e-mail, just to show my interest in commencing with a Ph.(not sending a Proposal or a CV, and haven't received any response yet.What do you think is the best way to approach a prospective Ph.supervisor? Face-to-face or by e-mail? Should I be brief or elaborate on my proposed study? Furthermore I wanted to ask the following: If I find a Ph.with no funding attached to it, can I still expect that in the case of fruitful discussion with a potential supervisor he/she could guide towards the process of funding? Thank you in advance #37 Submitted by mmusingafi 252484 on December 18, 2015 - 1:07pm insightful observations especially for postgraduate students, however subject to debate #38 Submitted by 254587 on January 2, 2016 - 8:25am What can one say when a man is pointing a gun at you at a range of 10 feet? One thing i now know, is that, the so called Professors have already made name and hence, do not care that much for others (most of them).I finished from the University of Gent in Belgium with a Master's degree.After the approval from my supervisor to come and defend my thesis,i defended in 9 minutes of the 15 minutes allocated and praise was poured out in the hall, but guess what? One of the examiners refused giving me even a pass mark, saying the text i have to edit and this that blah blah blah.

The consequences is that i lost another 1yr 3mths before i could finish and get a masters why didn't they indict my my supervisor? Meaning my Prof never even take a critical look at my work.Asides, he is their colleague and would never make a fool of him before me, making me a scape goat.My advice is; the ultimate goal in life is, the end that matters and, if you chose to carve a niche for yourself whether in the academia or otherwise, shut up and try and navigate your way towards getting your PhD and fuck those shylocks.Sadly, most Profs forgot they were once below the ladder, but do they really care? Sorry they don't!!! Your thesis, PhD certificate is your own, your life and your future.Whether straight or crook, your approach towards getting it without probs depends on you.

Love your write up and keep it up! #39 Submitted by Anonymouse on January 5, 2016 - 12:47pm For me, the PhD was a strange experience.In some respects, the PhD itself was far too easy.In my opinion, over the three years, I got very limited feedback on my research or writing (that's when I managed to get feedback) and my work wasn't subject to any real challenges or criticisms.In truth, I don't believe my thesis was read in any detail before submission.

These reasons were the source of stress for me and I felt the viva would be very tough (I know I was convinced I was going to fail and debated whether or not to actually attend the viva).The viva was a horrible experience and very, very challenging but I could not fault the examiners as they did a superb job (in my opinion, they provided much more feedback on my work than my supervisors did over the course of three years).In brief, the supervisor who sat in on the viva must have got unnerved because, from what I can gather, this supervisor asked for the corrections from the internal and although the supervisor passed a copy of the corrections to me, it was the supervisor who, in my opinion, started doing them, passing some of the corrected corrections to me and would happily have done the lot - had I not eventually asserted myself and taken control of the situation.It's not good being placed in a situation where you have to challenge a superior and I feel I was placed in a no-win situation.

On a positive note, although I've suffered and am still uptight about it all, I don't feel this supervisor will attempt to do this again.#40 Submitted by Ed Rybicki on January 18, 2016 - 12:05pm OK, this article needs to come with a content warning: "Most of this content does not apply or is irrelevant for laboratory-based science PhDs".Seriously - take this bit for example: "Some supervisors claim co-authorship of every publication written during the candidature.

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Do not think that this is right, assumed, proper or the default setting" Really? When I as supervisor may have (a) had the research idea and posed the questions; (b) come up with the money to support the student and the work; (c) supervised the project work closely and aided in the interpretation? Sorry - this may work in social sciences or humanities, but not in wet/hard science! #41 Submitted by lambie on September 5, 2016 - 6:10pm It is true, I am in a laboratory-based engineering science.

My supervisors' are always included as co-authors.

#42 Submitted by charlesoppenheim on May 2, 2016 - 7:43pm It's a long time since I've read such a pompous yet flawed essay Jeremy Bentham joins exhibition in New York. UCL has mounted a meticulously-planned operation to enable its spiritual forebear Jeremy Bentham to achieve in death what he always wanted to do in life: visit America..#42 Submitted by charlesoppenheim on May 2, 2016 - 7:43pm It's a long time since I've read such a pompous yet flawed essay.

#43 Submitted by chi8319 297687 on May 3, 2016 - 4:12pm The 10 truths are quite helpful in that it is an insight to some of the things to expect during your program.However, i am currently a doctoral student and have been under a supervisor who is so nasty to her students Internships & Final year thesis   You have the option of working in disciplines such as engineering, manufacturing, supply chain, human resources (HR), finance, Information technology (IT) and   To qualify, you must be enrolled in a university and be looking for a placement that will last between 3 months and 1 year..However, i am currently a doctoral student and have been under a supervisor who is so nasty to her students.My case is very similar to that of the poster (csadangi) where the supervisor doesn't care about your health but expects a doctoral student to be in school daily from 8 am - 4 pm either busy or not without any financial support.I have being under supervision for 2 years researching on things that most of the masters and doctoral students have being doing for years.

I spoke to her about creating my own research niche but she refused and threatened to write a bad recommendation letter for my postdoc in future.well, i have decided to get a new supervisor and complete my doctoral program in with a specialist in my field of study.This system should be looked into because most of these supervisors use the students as money making machine like my former supervisor will always say to the PG students.#44 Submitted by vvasil on June 4, 2016 - 8:55am Hi, I have started my phd about 15 months ago.I have gathered some bibliography, made some initial reading, but work and family difficulties do not allow me to invest the time I would like.

What would you advise me? To drop it, or adopt a more systematic strategy, like part time, put small goals to achieve, and organize better my time? I am totally confused.Although I have gathered a lot of books, articles etc, I have not written a single page.Some advise/ encouragement please? Many thanks in advance! #45 Submitted by Cyber12 on July 3, 2016 - 10:33am Hi, I have just started my PhD.I think like all students there are good and more bad days.I have two supervisors, one which I chose and the other that was chosen for me.

However, they have got students towards the end.At the end of the day I have learnt the best way to get through is to put up and shut and keep going in the end you will get the PhD as long as you keep going! As a student you just have to remember that 3/4 years of your life will quickly flyby and we will all look back at the experience and just that's over! Supervisors can make your life hell and they are in a position of advice just play the game and keep going! #46 Submitted by Rey2 on July 7, 2016 - 11:23am Having worked for many years as an Admin/Coordinator in a Research Centre (top univ) for PhD students, these truths really resonated with me.I constantly witnessed international students being put aside as the professor globe-trotted, attending conferences, networking, missing supervisory meetings and doing little research himself.His second in command became demoralised and increasingly worked from home, keeping out of students way.

I was left with the responsibility of trying to reassure students everything would be alright in the end, when I could see what was happening.Students were taken on to boost the Centre's numbers, image and finances.Eventually students' complaints and slow progress or failures led to closure of the centre (publicly closure was said to be for economic reasons).I changed jobs and moved into another school at the same university and wrote my own proposal.On acceptance of a proposal said to be 'up with the very best' I was given a young very confident supervisor and felt simply grateful.

I was her first PhD student and had an experienced second supervisor.The former had passed PhD a year previously, the latter was applying for a year's sabbatical for research.After 7 weeks as a PhD student, and after receiving constant ageist comments (why are you doing this, you will get tired, wasting your time) and no support whatsoever from the inexperienced lead supervisor who clearly did not want to supervise me (or prog director who said she supported her young trainee's comments), I transferred to another university who had praised my proposal and also offered me supervision.This time I checked their profiles, publications and agreed regular meeting dates with them.I then transferred from the Russell Univ to a 1994 University and had a wonderful PhD experience, completing in 3.

5 years and working as a research assistant for the school alongside writing my thesis My new supervisors were supportive, answered emails within 48 hrs maximum, kept appointments, discussed, listened, praised, criticised and encouraged.Had I stay with the first university my story would probably not have been one of success, I would not have a doctorate and I would not be writing a book now, so yes these 10 truths are very honest and helpful to potential PhD students.#47 Submitted by kakuasare on July 11, 2016 - 1:16pm This is very insightful, As a postgraduate student myself I have learnt a lot.Especially 2,7,8,9 #48 Submitted by yoshinta on July 20, 2016 - 5:00pm Indeed! My supervisor has these 3 characteristics #49 Submitted by MaxPhD on July 21, 2016 - 12:23pm All very idealistic.On #1, how can you check a prospective supervisor's completion record? Such data is only useful if it includes both completions and non-completions.

That's confidential and is something that no university or individual supervisor would want to publish (unless, of course, HE funding councils insist on this, and make it a condition of continued funding, but that's another argument altogether).On #9, I mostly come across termly meetings (yes, astonishingly, a maximum of 3 meetings per year!).I once asked for monthly meetings and was told that's unrealistic, even though the university's own PhD supervision code recommends it.The idea of weekly meetings would simply get no traction at all - at least not in my experience.I think a good solution to poor supervisors (and poor supervision, which is not always the same thing) is to give prospective students access to the supervisor's current students for advice.

This would enable applicants to cut through the university's marketing hype and hear from those who have real experience of that particular supervisor, before signing away 3-4 years of their life.Of course, there should be no room for current students to take personal swipes, so if they were limited to objective criteria, in an email that the Director of PG Research proof reads before it's sent off, this would keep it all fair and professional.Such criteria can include: how often does the supervisor attend meetings? Is it with the frequency that the student has asked for? Does the supervisor read chapter drafts and provide feedback? If so, is it verbal or written feedback? Do meetings include discussions on the substantive topic, or does the supervisor limit him/herself to advising on dissertation structure only? If there is substantive chat, does the supervisor enjoy getting into the details, or does he/she stand back, only talk about high-level stuff and allow the student to 'fill in the details'? There's no right or wrong answer to any of these questions, just true answers that a prospective student would then match up with their own working and learning style.And that's the most important thing: to get matched up with the right supervisor, based on how that supervisor really does work.Only current students can answer those questions, not the supervisor him/herself, and certainly not the university's supervision code.

#50 Submitted by PhD Newbie on August 26, 2016 - 1:44pm Very good insights.The warning signs about their work is especially telling.